ASUS Maximus XII Extreme Gundam Motherboard Pictured, Comes With A Pre-Installed EK Mono Block & An Extremely Unaesthetic Design_5f85690f7e019.jpeg

ASUS Maximus XII Extreme Gundam Motherboard Pictured, Comes With A Pre-Installed EK Mono Block & An Extremely Unaesthetic Design

ASUS will soon be launching its latest ROG Maximum XII Extreme Gundam motherboard which is based on the Z490 chipset and themed after the Gundam series. The motherboard was pictured and leaked by Videocardz and is themed in the E.F.S.F (Earth Federation Space Force) colors while featuring an EK Monoblock for the CPU, VRMs and PCH.

ASUS’s ROG Maximus XII Extreme Gundam Is A Very Uninspiring Gundam Themed Motherboard With A Enthusiast-Tier Design

The ASUS ROG Maximus XII Extreme Gundam is more or less a standard ROG Maximus XII board which has been slapped with an EK Monoblock and some new yet uninspiring colors which ASUS could definitely have done a better job with. The upper shroud that covers the PCIe slots has the same livery as the E.F.S.F but ASUS could’ve offered a better design given that this is going to be a limited edition product for Gundam series fans.

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Regardless, let’s take a look at the specifications of the ASUS ROG Maximus XII Extreme Gundam motherboard. The specifications for the Maximus XII Extreme are quite intense as we are looking at VRM that consists of 16 Infineon (TDA21490) power stages which can handle up to 90A, 45A Microfine Alloy Chokes, and high-quality Japanese capacitors capable of over 10,000 hours. This 16 phase VRM is powered by dual 8-pin connectors which provide power to the PWM unit and the LGA 1200 socket itself.

Other specifications include four DDR4 DIMM slots which can support up to 128 GB capacities with speeds of up to 4800 MHz+ (32 GB capacities operate at DDR4-3600 CL16 with Optimem III). The board makes use of an 8 layer PCB and comes with the prementioned EK Monoblock that covers the CPU, VRMs, and PCH for extra cooling on custom loop setups. There’s also an aluminum heatsink cover near the PCIe slots which provides cooling to the M.2 slots. ASUS uses high conductive thermal pads to ensure that heat is transferred to the heatsink blocks effectively.

The board features 2 PCIe 3.0 x16 slots, a single PCIe 3.0 x4 slot, and a total of 4 M.2 slots, two of which are cooled by the aluminum cover heatsinks & two on the DIMM.2 module which is shipped with this motherboard and houses its own heatsink. The ROG Maximus XII Extreme is an insane motherboard and hence, it comes in an EATX form factor.

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You should also expect the best range of I/O on this motherboard such as a total of 22 USB ports (Internal + External) with the ones included on the rear panel being 6 USB 3.1 Gen 1, 3 USB 3.2 Gen 2 (1 Type-C), 1 USB 3.2 Gen 2×2, there’s SupremeFX S1220 codec for the audio, dual ethernet LAN (Aquantia AQC107 10G / Intel I225-V 2.5G), WiFi 6 AX201 with Bluetooth V.5.1 support, a bundled ThunderboltEX 3-TR card and support for both SLI & CFX. There are also 2 USB 3.2 Gen 2 front panel headers on the motherboard.

You can also find a BIOS flash-back and a Clear CMOS button on the rear panel which is a must-have for ASUS ROG series boards along with the various tuning switches and buttons on the PCB too. The motherboard offers a total of 8 SATA III ports. It also doesn’t make sense to get such an expensive board unless you’re a big Gundam fan which this board is marketed towards since Z590 boards are suggested to release in the next few months with much better features. The ASUS ROG Maximus XII Extreme had a price of $749.99 US so the GUNDAM limited variant should retail at around close to $1000 US since it also has the premium Monoblock installed. The board could be limited to the Japanese market too.

Intel Rocket Lake S PCIE 4.0 NVME SSD Performance With Seagate FireCuda Tested_5f8081fdd08db.jpeg

Intel Rocket Lake S PCIE 4.0 NVME SSD Performance With Seagate FireCuda Tested

A tech publication on Facebook (ITCooker via Videocardz) has leaked the first testing of an Intel PCIe 4.0 bus. The platform being tested is the upcoming Intel Rocket Lake which is scheduled for release in 2021. PCIe 4.0 SSDs are going to provide a significant uplift in storage performance and will likely be necessary for games that feature asset streaming. The benchmark itself was done using Seagate’s FireCuda PCIE 4.0 drive and an 11th gen CPU coupled with a Z490 motherboard.

Intel Rocket Lake S gets tested with a PCIe 4.0 NVME SSD drive and an RX 5700 XT

The leak appears to stem from Taiwan and they claimed they had access to a “next-generation” CPU which they tested on a Z490 motherboard. Considering the only next-generation CPU that will work with a Z490 is Rocket Lake, its not really hard to guess what they used. The screenshots provided show that CPUZ is not able to properly read the samples which means they were likely using early Engineering Samples. Since Rocket Lake S fits just fine on the LGA 1200 socket, customers with Z490 motherboards will have a clear upgrade path when the SKUs land in 2021.

Intel Confirms Rocket Lake Landing In Q1 2021 And PCIe 4.0 Support

The CrystalDiskMark shown had a ready speed of 5GB/s and a write speed of 4.2 GB/s (sequential) which is only possible on a PCIe 4.0 bus. This also means that you are going to see storage devices that greatly exceed this (for cheap) very soon and just in time for the next-gen console launch. Coupled with tech like RTX IO, blazing fast SSDs are going to be a major upgrade point for consumers. The RX 5700 XT GPU was stress tested with Furmark and GPUz shoed PCIe 4.0 active in x16 mode as well.

RKL-S is based on the 14nm process, but unlike older generations, it will feature a revamped architecture (Willow Cove), PCIe 4.0 support and Xe graphics. Think of it as a backport of the advanced architecture reserved for 10nm to 14nm so the company can maximally utilize its foundry capacity. Since it is based on the 14nm process, a leaked benchmark (Geekbench via _rogame) indicates that it will be able to boost up to 5.0 GHz (which is typical for the highly mature process right now) allowing for a best of both worlds situation where a new architecture is able to hit the ground running (speaking from a clock speed perspective) because of the highly mature node.

Backporting is a usually a double-edged sword because if 10nm isn’t able to sufficiently compete in terms of power efficiency gains, the loss in clock speed from shifting to the infant 10nm process (when it happens) could result in reduced performance from the bar that Rocket Lake is going to set when it launches. In the meantime, however, this is great news for enthusiasts because RKL is going to be the first major new architecture in a very long time. Early benchmarks of the platform were spotted over at Geekbench and they are expected to come to market sometime in late 2020 or possibly by early 2021.

Intel Desktop Roadmap Through Q2 2021 Leaked – No HEDT Update Till 2H 2021, RKL-S In Mid March

A 5.0 GHz boost clock combined with a major new architecture should offer the best possible combination for a performance upgrade for Intel customers (although at the cost of similar TDP) in  a very long time and I am personally really excited to see how this performs. Backporting could also turn out to be Intel’s saving grace as it misstepped on 10nm and now again on 7nm.

Rocket Lake-S will be housed on 500-series motherboards and will have features that are characteristic of a major architectural change. Willow Cove itself is going to result in massive IPC uplifts and considering this is based on the 14nm process – it will be able to sustain the high clock speeds that were the saving grace of Intel’s current generation of processors. The result is a platform that is significantly faster (think Nehalem to Sandy Bridge) than the generation it succeeds and could even put the hurt to its upcoming 10nm family if the clock rates don’t improve enough.

It features 12bit AV1, HEVC and E2E compression along with the new Xe graphics architecture – which should make pretty much all of these processors ship with entry-level gaming capability. New overclocking capabilities will also be included (Intel will want to boast its clocks if this is going to be the last generation on 14nm). PCIe 4.0 is also finally included along with increased DDR4 support natively. 20 total CPU PCIe 4.0 lanes are included with Intel Rocket Lake S although the chipset on the motherboard should add quite a few more. It is not confirmed at this point where the PCH PCIe lanes will be PCIe 4.0 as well.

Discrete Intel Thunderbolt 4 (USB4 compliant) is also included – which should also significant IO speedup (think faster-attached storage as well as external dGPU enclosures). All in all, this is shaping up to be a solid upgrade over Intel’s existing lineup. The only thing that might raise some eyebrows is the fact that Intel SGX security appears to have been removed. I am sure Intel must have had a very good reason to do this but in the wake of the tons of security vulnerabilities, the company has fallen prey to, all eyes of security enthusiasts and corporate clients will be on features like these.

Intel ‘Rocket Lake’ Desktop Processor With Next Generation Willow Cove Cores Landing In 2021_5f7de97a69606.jpeg

Intel ‘Rocket Lake’ Desktop Processor With Next Generation Willow Cove Cores Landing In 2021

According to Videocardz, Intel is targetting March 2021 as the launch date for its next-generation Rocket Lake S desktop processors. While there were rumors of Rocket Lake previously targetting CES 2021 as the launch window, it now seems that week 10 of 2021 (or March) is now the actual launch date. The next-generation platform features the completely revamped Willow Cove cores and will retain support for LGA1200 sockets in a move that would pleasantly surprise gamers.

Intel Rocket Lake CPUs with Willow Cove cores,  5.0 GHz boost, PCIe 4.0 and Xe Graphics targetting March 2021

RKL-S is based on the 14nm process, but unlike older generations, it will feature a revamped architecture (Willow Cove), PCIe 4.0 support and Xe graphics. Think of it as a backport of the advanced architecture reserved for 10nm to 14nm so the company can maximally utilize its foundry capacity. Since it is based on the 14nm process, a leaked benchmark (Geekbench via _rogame) indicates that it will be able to boost up to 5.0 GHz (which is typical for the highly mature process right now) allowing for a best of both worlds situation where a new architecture is able to hit the ground running (speaking from a clock speed perspective) because of the highly mature node.

Backporting is a usually a double-edged sword because if 10nm isn’t able to sufficiently compete in terms of power efficiency gains, the loss in clock speed from shifting to the infant 10nm process (when it happens) could result in reduced performance from the bar that Rocket Lake is going to set when it launches. In the meantime, however, this is great news for enthusiasts because RKL is going to be the first major new architecture in a very long time. Early benchmarks of the platform were spotted over at Geekbench and they are expected to come to market sometime in late 2020 or possibly by early 2021.

A 5.0 GHz boost clock combined with a major new architecture should offer the best possible combination for a performance upgrade for Intel customers (although at the cost of similar TDP) in  a very long time and I am personally really excited to see how this performs. Backporting could also turn out to be Intel’s saving grace as it misstepped on 10nm and now again on 7nm.

Rocket Lake-S will be housed on 500-series motherboards and will have features that are characteristic of a major architectural change. Willow Cove itself is going to result in massive IPC uplifts and considering this is based on the 14nm process – it will be able to sustain the high clock speeds that were the saving grace of Intel’s current generation of processors. The result is a platform that is significantly faster (think Nehalem to Sandy Bridge) than the generation it succeeds and could even put the hurt to its upcoming 10nm family if the clock rates don’t improve enough.

It features 12bit AV1, HEVC and E2E compression along with the new Xe graphics architecture – which should make pretty much all of these processors ship with entry-level gaming capability. New overclocking capabilities will also be included (Intel will want to boast its clocks if this is going to be the last generation on 14nm). PCIe 4.0 is also finally included along with increased DDR4 support natively. 20 total CPU PCIe 4.0 lanes are included with Intel Rocket Lake S although the chipset on the motherboard should add quite a few more. It is not confirmed at this point where the PCH PCIe lanes will be PCIe 4.0 as well.

Discrete Intel Thunderbolt 4 (USB4 compliant) is also included – which should also significant IO speedup (think faster-attached storage as well as external dGPU enclosures). All in all, this is shaping up to be a solid upgrade over Intel’s existing lineup. The only thing that might raise some eyebrows is the fact that Intel SGX security appears to have been removed. I am sure Intel must have had a very good reason to do this but in the wake of the tons of security vulnerabilities, the company has fallen prey to, all eyes of security enthusiasts and corporate clients will be on features like these.

While we do not have any idea of the kind of IPC we can expect going from Comet Lake S to Rocket Lake S, all evidence points to this being a “revolutionary” jump as opposed to an “evolutionary” one. In fact, this leak would actually make gamers and enthusiasts wait for the arrival of RKL-S and skip Comet Lake S entirely because of the massive opportunity cost that this platform will leave them with.

Intel 12th Generation ‘Alder Lake’ CPU With 8 + 8 Cores Spotted In Sisoft Sandra Benchmark_5f7de97512bae.png

Intel 12th Generation ‘Alder Lake’ CPU With 8 + 8 Cores Spotted In Sisoft Sandra Benchmark

A Sisoft Sandra Listing of Intel’s upcoming 12th generation “Alder Lake” platform has leaked out (via Videocardz). The CPU is a 16 core (technically an 8+8) / 32 thread (technically 16+16) part with 8 big and 8 small cores. Alder Lake is aimed dead center at the mobility market and should offer the best of both worlds: power savings of small cores for standby and mundane tasks and performance of big cores.

Intel Alder Lake S smiles for the camera in Sisoft Sandra benchmark

The platform is slated to arrive sometime in late 2021 (it will come after Rocket Lake) and is expected to feature PCIe 5.0 and DDR5 support. The device detected in the leak has 16 cores, 12.5 MB of L2 cache and 30 MB of L3 cache. The big cores are “Golden Cove” which is the successor of “Willow Cove” while the small cores are called Gracemont.

Benchmark results of Intel Alder Lake platform.

This particular instance does not mention the exact memory configuration that the device was rocking but did mention DRR4. If that is a typo for DDR4 then it could imply that Intel is planning to keep DDR5 exclusive to desktops for now (which would make sense considering laptops don’t really need all that much bandwidth). The clock rate was shown as 1.38 GHz although this is almost certainly an incorrect reading considering the big and small cores will be clocked differently and Sisoft will need to be updated before it can properly read this.

Intel Alder Lake CPUs will feature 32 EUs likely based on next-gen Xe Graphics

This might be disappointing news for some (I know it is for me) since it means that the GPU will be less powerful than the Tiger Lake iGPU expected to launch next month but there is a silver lining (as always). It actually does make sense from a business perspective because anyone buying a high-end S-class core from Intel will be equipping that with a discrete GPU and a high-end onboard GPU will only increase costs for the customer. To put this in perspective, this is a strategy utilized by AMD processors that don’t ship with an iGPU at all.

The iGPU itself is currently clocked at 500 MHz, which is something that I am sure will go up to 800 MHz to 1 GHz at the very least once drivers and revisions are finalized. Depending on the exact clock (800 MHz or 1 GHz), the iGPU will have a performance level of around 0.5 TFLOPs which is meager to say the least (but better than nothing). Considering this means that Intel is focusing on cost [opinion], I would also hazard a guess that the company will be slashing MSRP for its next generations lineup once again as it prepares to face off against AMD’s formidable Zen-based CPUs.

Of course, the most interesting thing about the Alder Lake processors isn’t going to be the iGPU or even the 10nm process – it’s going to be the new big and small architectural design. This design coupled will allow the company to increase power efficiency significantly without trading away raw performance and will be the perfect architecture for mobility.

Tiger Lake’s successor will have at least 128 EUs for some seriously impressive onboard power. The TGL iGPU has already EoL-ed NVIDIA’s MX150 and 250 and trades blows with the 350 and a successor could do the same for the upcoming MX450. Raja Koduri has already stated that the company plans to double performance every generation for the foreseeable future and the TGL successor should have twice the TFLOPs count as a result. Alder Lake’s big and small cores coupled with Tiger Lake’s successor’s iGPU is where the real battle for integrated graphics is going to be fought.

Intel Alder Lake CPU configurations:

The desktop side of Alder Lake, called Alder Lake S will have up to 125W TDP and up to 8 big cores + 8 small cores. Depending on whether or not you can use all cores simultaneously, this is either an 8 core design or a 12-ish core equivalent design in terms of power. The presence of small, highly power-efficient cores will allow the company to reduce standby and idle power consumption as well as menial loads (like light browsing etc).

According to the data posted by the source, Alder Lake series platforms would be:

  • Alder Lake-S
    • 8 Big Cores + 8 Small Cores with a GT1 GPU
    • 6 Big Cores + 0 Small Cores with a GT1 GPU
  • Alder Lake-P
    • 2 Big Cores + 8 Small Cores with a GT2 GPU
    • 6 Big Cores + 8 Small Cores with a GT2 GPU
  • Alder Lake-M
    • 2 Big Cores + 8 Small Cores with a GT2 GPU

There is also an Alder Lake P which could probably stand for the Atom Server series if older Intel P series SKUs are any indication. Servers that have a highly dynamic workload (think servers that can scale client loads) would also benefit from this technology as it would make scaling between light and heavy workloads more power-efficient.

An Intel Alder Lake M is also in the works which is likely going to be the mobility series. This is the one we are most excited about. The presence of light cores would allow the company to extend the battery lives of laptops significantly as they would no longer have to engage the heavy cores for light tasks.

Intel’s Alder Lake CPUs based on 10++ process will feature 8 big and 8 little cores on the LGA 1700 socket

A very interesting post about Intel’s upcoming 10nm-based Alder Lake processors was posted on Chinese PC shopping forums recently. This post was very surprising because not only is Alder Lake quite far out on the horizon (It will be preceded by Rocket Lake which should succeed Comet Lake), it showcases the introduction of a philosophy that has been wildly successful in smartphones: big.LITTLE.

While this particular leak is dedicated to desktop processors, if this technology is introduced in Alder Lake then you can be sure it will trickle down to the notebook parts as well – and it is there which should be able to add some serious value. The big.LITTLE philosophy (invented by ARM) allows processor manufacturers to selectively choose a high performance or a low energy cluster depending on need and demand. While it won’t make a lot of difference in a desktop environment, it makes a huge impact in mobility applications where TDP envelopes are usually constrained and power quite restricted. Before we go any further, here is a screenshot of the relevant slide:

The three types shown here range from an 8+8+1 configuration (8 big, high powered cores; 8 little, low power cores; and 1 integrated GPU) to a standard 6+1 configuration (only 6 “big” cores with an integrated GPU). The notes also state that Intel is investigating with a 150W design. While it is unclear why Intel is worried about power envelopes in a desktop environment we can expect that the company will allow the big cores to clock fairly high. It will also be interesting to see whether all 16 cores can work in tandem (or only 8 at a time as is usually the case). Judging from the fact that both the 8+8+1 and 6+1 SKUs have the same TDP, however, it likely won’t be possible for all cores to operate in tandem.

Intel Desktop Roadmap Through Q2 2021 Leaked – No HEDT Update Till 2H 2021, RKL-S In Mid March_5f7de970e3227.jpeg

Intel Desktop Roadmap Through Q2 2021 Leaked – No HEDT Update Till 2H 2021, RKL-S In Mid March

HDTechnologia (via Videocardz) has just leaked a roadmap for Intel motherboards through June 2021 and by virtue of it, the desktop roadmap of the CPU platforms that will use them. Some key tidbits include Rocket Lake S basically confirmed for a March 2021 launch (which we covered just recently) and no HEDT update till June 2021 (at least).

Intel roadmap leaked through June 2021, AMD allegedly not planning new motherboards for Zen3

The fact that there is no HEDT update till June 2021 from Intel actually fits into the leak we recently posted. If Rocket Lake is going to arrive in March 2021, then HEDT should arrive sometime in Q3 2020. Intel’s HEDT lineup always updates a period later than mainstream desktop so we should see the HEDT upgrade we have all been waiting for some time in late 2021.

Intel’s HEDT side is currently still on the older generation architecture and Willow Cove (which is basically backported 10nm+) will represent a substantial upgrade in performance without sacrificing clock speeds. It is even possible that Intel decides to skip RKL on HEDT and move directly to 10nm – which would be amazing for everyone concerned.

If you look at the roadmap, the X299 bar extends for the next 8 months – which either means Intel will roll out the next generation of HEDT on the same socket and platform (unlikely) or we aren’t getting an update till 2H 2021 (likely). The 500 series motherboards (that will herald the start of the Rocket Lake S era) will land sometime in mid-March in 2021. The Z590 gaming flagship and the H570, B580 and H510 motherboards will be landing in that time as well. This coincides with what we have heard about Rocket Lake S timeframe. Interestingly, the W580 and Q470 motherboards will be landing a while later in mid-April.

This also serves as secondary confirmation for Rocket Lake S being on the 14nm process (and therefore a confirmation of the backport) because you can see the process node given in brackets along with the motherboard as well. To be clear, this likely refers to the chipsets and not the processors (although the node is usually the same for both). The source also states that AMD is not working on any new motherboards for Zen 3 and instead will work on a refresh. If this is true then that means that AMD is not going to introducee DDR5 until Zen 4. If Alder Lake does indeed have DDR5 support then this means there is a slim chance Intel might actually beat red to DDR5 and PCIe 5.0 support.

With NVIDIA high-end GPUs also out of stock and not expected to ship in volume until early 2021, it looks like next year is going to be the ultimate year for upgrades – both on the CPU side and the GPU side, regardless of which camp you belong to. With the next iteration fo Zen, Navi, Intel’s Rocket Lake, and NVIDIA Ampere parts available next year, the cost of gaming should come down significantly.

What do you think of Rocket Lake?
AMD Big Navi “Navi 21” GPU For Flagship Radeon R9 6900 XT Graphics Card Allegedly Pictured, Massive Die & GDDR6 Memory Confirmed_5f7901bcae3fc.jpeg

AMD Big Navi “Navi 21” GPU For Flagship Radeon R9 6900 XT Graphics Card Allegedly Pictured, Massive Die & GDDR6 Memory Confirmed

An alleged picture of AMD’s Big Navi “Navi 21” GPU which would power the next-generation flagship, Radeon RX 6900 XT, graphics card has been leaked out by Coreteks. Powered by the RDNA2 architecture, the AMD Big Navi GPU looks to be massive in size when compared to past AMD flagship GPU offerings.

AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT’d “Big Navi” RDNA 2 GPU Allegedly Pictured, Massive Die & GDDR6 Memory

Coreteks has removed all references and labels over the GPU die to mask his sources but he did state that the GPU we are looking at is indeed the Big Navi “Navi 21” GPU which is going to be featured on the flagship Radeon RX 6900 XT graphics card. The GPU seems fairly large & is said to measure at around 536mm2 though those are just rough calculations and the final die size could be higher or lower. The die size also seems to be close to the previous rumors which pointed out a 505mm2 die size for the flagship GPU.

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One key aspect of this leak is that it shows the alleged Navi 21 GPU in a fairly standard die package. This would point out to a GDDR6 based memory configuration rather than HBM2(e) as many leaks have pointed out in the past. There is still some speculation that the Navi 21 XT and XL dies will be featuring standard GDDR6 configurations while the Navi 21 XTX die is going to utilize HBM2(e) sub-system for memory but that is speculation territory and hasn’t been confirmed yet.

The recent leaks along with the leaked PCB pictures of the card suggest that it would feature 16 GB of GDDR6 memory across a 256-bit bus interface.  Do note that 16 GB VRAM is also possible with a 512-bit interface so AMD is also open to that option when the final specifications are released. We a few weeks to go till the line-up reveal but AMD and the tech press are providing us with a handful of teaser and leaks in the meanwhile.

AMD Radeon RX 6900 Series With Triple-Slot Cooling Solution:

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12 Core & Ryzen 7 5800X 8 Core “Zen 3” CPUs Could Potentially Launch As Early As 20th October

As for the designs themselves, the Radeon RX 6000 flagship cooling design looks amazing with the red and black design. The card features a triple axial-tech fan setup on the shroud and has a large aluminum heatsink that runs beneath it. The card has a LED-lit Radeon logo on the side and there is a large cut out on the side for the fans to vent out hot air. This design is very reminiscent of the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20 series Founders Edition cooler. The card will feature dual 8-pin power and display ports would include a USB Type-C (VirtualLink), 1 HDMI, and 2 DisplayPort connectors.

The card also features a fancy backplate along with a retention bracket to hold the cooler in place. The Radeon RX “Big Navi” GPU looks like it will come in the standard 2-slot reference design which is the same as NVIDIA’s flagship RTX 3080 but not as huge as the triple-slot GeForce RTX 3090.

Here’s Everything We Know About RDNA 2 Based Radeon RX Navi 6000 Desktop GPUs

The AMD RDNA 2 based Radeon RX Navi 2x graphics card family is also touted to disrupt the 4K gaming segment similar to how Ryzen disrupted the entire CPU landscape. That’s a pretty bold claim from AMD themselves but leaks and rumors are suggesting that this might be the case for AMD’s next-generation Radeon RX graphics cards.

AMD unveiled that its RDNA 2 GPUs will deliver a similar performance jump over the first-gen RDNA GPUs like Zen 2 delivered over Zen 1. The first RDNA GPUs delivered a massive 50% increase in performance per watt over GCN architecture and RDNA 2 GPUs are expected to do the same over RDNA 1, delivering another 50% increase in performance per watt.

According to the roadmap shared by AMD, the RDNA 2 GPUs would feature three key features that will be part of the new GPU architecture. First and foremost is the performance per watt increase which is due to a number of reasons. AMD will be shifting from TSMC’s 7nm process to the more advanced 7nm process node. The new process node itself increases transistor efficiency on the new GPUs while decreasing its overall size, allowing AMD to cram more performance in a much smaller package.

The key changes that have led to a 50% increase in performance per watt include a redesigned micro-architecture with improved performance-per-clock (IPC), a logic enhancement that helps reduce design complexity and switching power, and physical optimizations such as increased clock speeds.

AMD has also announced that RDNA 2 GPUs would feature VRS (Variable Rate Shading) and hardware-accelerated ray tracing. AMD is following suit with NVIDIA here who have already implemented the said technologies on its Turing GPU based GeForce RTX graphics cards. With the launch of the new consoles from Microsoft and Sony imminent, AMD is going to work to provide these features with its own optimization framework to developers for integration within next-generation gaming titles.

AMD has also recently showcased its RDNA 2 GPUs running Microsoft’s DXR 1.1 (DirectX 12 API Ultimate) demo internally which utilizes hardware-accelerated ray tracing. AMD’s approach to ray tracing is to offer simplified development and speedy adopting and that is definitely possible through consoles where the mass majority of game developers focus their efforts towards.

AMD’s CEO, Dr. Lisa Su, has already stated that we can expect a new RDNA 2 GPU based Radeon RX high-end family and a 7nm RDNA refresh family to launch this year. The same was stated during the presentation in which it was stated that the “Navi 2x” lineup would scale from top to bottom and as the name suggests, would deliver twice the performance efficiency increase over the first-generation RX graphics cards. AMD’s CFO, Devinder Kumar also shed some light on the RDNA 2 GPU based Radeon RX products for the PC platform, stating that PCs will be first to get a taste of the new architecture in the form of the Big Navi (Halo) graphics card followed by mainstream GPUs.

“There’s a lot of excitement for Navi 2, or what our fans have dubbed as the Big Navi“

“Big Navi is a halo product”

“Enthusiasts love to buy the best, and we are certainly working on giving them the best”.

“RDNA 2 architecture goes through the entire stack“

“it will go from mainstream GPUs all the way up to the enthusiasts and then the architecture also goes into the game console products… as well as our integrated APU products.

“This allows us to leverage the larger ecosystem, accelerate the development of exciting features like ray tracing and more.”

via AMD’s CFO, Devinder Kumar

Some of the features to expect from 2nd Generation RDNA Navi GPUs would be:

  • Optimized 7nm process node
  • Enthusiast-grade desktop graphics card options
  • Hardware-Level Ray Tracing Support
  • A mix of GDDR6 graphics cards
  • More power-efficient than First-Gen Navi GPUs

One of the key features on the Big Navi Radeon RX GPU is that it is going to disrupt the 4K gaming segment, similar to how Ryzen disrupted the entire CPU segment. These are some bold claims by AMD, but if those rumored specifications are anything to go by, then these claims may not be that far fetched.

“With the Radeon 5000-series we are essentially covering 90-something-percent of the total PC gamers today,” says Chandrasekhar. “And so that’s the reason why no 4K right now, it’s because the vast majority of them are at 1440p and 1080p.

“That doesn’t mean a 4K-capable GPU isn’t coming, it is coming, but for here and now we want to focus on the vast majority of gamers.”

“Similar to Ryzen,” he says, “all of us need a thriving Radeon GPU ecosystem. So, are we going after 4K, and going to similarly disrupt 4K? Absolutely, you can count on that. But that’s all I can say right now.”

– PCGamesN

Once again, AMD in its own presentation emphasized enthusiast-class performance for the RDNA 2 based Radeon RX ‘Navi 2X’ GPUs so that’s something to consider. The competition however from the other side won’t just go eyes closed as AMD launches its high-performance graphics cards.

AMD will officially be unveiling its Radeon RX 6000 series graphics card family on October 28th. The second half of 2020 would definitely be interesting times for all the hardware enthusiasts and mainstream PC gamers who are looking forward to upgrading their PCs with the best hardware.

How fast do you think AMD’s Big Navi (RDNA 2) GPU Powered Radeon RX graphics cards will be?
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ampere Mobility GPU With 8 GB Memory Pictured, RTX 2080 Ti Tier Performance Coming To Laptops Soon!_5f765433eca0f.jpeg

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ampere Mobility GPU With 8 GB Memory Pictured, RTX 2080 Ti Tier Performance Coming To Laptops Soon!

The first NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 series mobility GPU, the GeForce RTX 3070, based on the Ampere architecture has been pictured. The picture got leaked over at Chinese NGA forums (via @9550pro) and shows us that NVIDIA’s Ampere line of mobility GPUs could be hitting the notebook segment real soon.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ampere Mobility GPU Pictured – Based on GA104 GPU With 8 GB Memory & Performance On Par With A RTX 2080 Ti Inside A Laptop

The picture shows the first GeForce RTX 30 series mobility GPU from NVIDIA, the GA104 (Ampere) based GeForce RTX 3070. This is also the first time we are looking at the GA104 GPU die in general which measures at 395.2mm2 and features 17.4 Billion transistors. Now the source doesn’t really mention any core specifications but considering what we got in the previous generation with the GeForce RTX 20 mobility lineup, the GeForce RTX 3070 mobility could match the desktop GeForce RTX 3070 graphics card in terms of specifications while featuring a slightly optimized clock speeds & power requirements.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti 8 GB Custom Models Listed, Four Models Including Gigabyte’s AORUS Master, Gaming & Eagle Series

In that case, the GeForce RTX 3070 Mobility could feature 5888 CUDA cores. The GPU pictured here also features the GN20-E5-A1 Qualification Sample codename and was manufactured around mid of August (2020) as made evident by the markings over the die.

What the source does specify is that the GeForce RTX 3070 could feature Hynix’s latest GDDR6 memory that operates with a low voltage of 1.2V. The memory alongside the GA104 is indeed HYNIX made and features the “H56C8H24AIR” product codename and operates at 12.00 Gbps memory speeds. The GeForce RTX 3070 mobility features 8 GB of memory along with a 256-bit wide interface that should deliver up to 384 GB/s of bandwidth which is slightly lower than the 448.00 GB/s bandwidth which the full GeForce RTX 3070 (Desktop) SKU will deliver.

We do not currently now the TDP or clock speeds of the card but considering that the GeForce RTX 3070 should match its desktop equivalent or come close to it, we can expect performance on par or close to the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti which would make the RTX 3070 mobility a very fast solution for the gaming laptop segment. But we can also expect to see the GA102 GPU coming in some shape or form to the laptop segment which would deliver even higher performance than the RTX 2080 Ti. Expect the announcement of the GeForce RTX 30 series mobility lineup around the end of the year.

Alleged AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12 Core & 24 Thread Zen 3 CPU Benchmark Leaks Out – Up To 15% Faster In Multi-Threaded & 25% Faster In Single-Threaded Tests Versus Ryzen 9 3900X_5f7541fc40972.png

Alleged AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12 Core & 24 Thread Zen 3 CPU Benchmark Leaks Out – Up To 15% Faster In Multi-Threaded & 25% Faster In Single-Threaded Tests Versus Ryzen 9 3900X

Alleged benchmarks of the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12 core and 24 thread Zen 3 CPU have leaked out and the performance increase over its predecessor is just spectacular. The leak comes in the form of a CPU-z screenshot of a 12 core and 24 thread AMD CPU running the single and multi-threaded tests as spotted by Twitter fellow, @9550pro.

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12 Core & 24 Thread Zen 3 CPU Alleged Benchmarks Leak Out – Up To 25% Faster Single-Core Performance Versus The Ryzen 9 3900X

The CPU-z screenshot shows an unreleased AMD processor with the 100-000000061-08 string. As per the details mentioned on the CPU-z application, the chip seems to feature a 12 core config as 24 threads are mentioned. As such, this could possibly be the first benchmark for the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X which is a next-generation Zen 3 powered processor that would feature 12 core & 24 thread design and replace the existing Ryzen 9 3900X CPU.

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There are no specifics about what clocks the alleged AMD Ryzen 9 5900X chip was run at or what platform and memory were used but it is highly liked that the tests were carried out on stock clocks which should be around 5 GHz based on a recent rumor. As for performance, the chip scored 652.8 points in the single-core test which is 27% faster than the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X and up to 25% faster than the Ryzen 9 3900X.

Coming to the multi-threaded performance test, the alleged AMD Ryzen 9 5900X CPU scored a total of 9481 points which is a massive 75% improvement over the Ryzen 7 3700X & a 15% improvement over the Ryzen 9 3900X.

Now once again, we don’t know for sure if this is indeed the Ryzen 9 5900X or some other chip or even if this benchmark is legitimate but if real, we are looking at an impressive performance jump over the Ryzen 3000 CPUs. The AMD Ryzen 5000 series lineup based on Zen 3 core architecture is officially set to be unveiled on the 8th of October or next week with recent rumors pointing to retail launch around the end of October. The AMD Ryzen 7 5800X benchmarks also leaked out just a few days ago.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series “Vermeer” CPU Lineup

CPU Name Cores/Threads Base Clock Boost Clock Cache (L2+L3) PCIe Lanes (Gen 4 CPU+PCH) TDP Price
AMD Ryzen 9 5950X 16/32 TBA TBA 72 MB TBA TBA TBA
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12/24 TBA TBA 70 MB TBA TBA TBA
AMD Ryzen 7 5800X 8/16 TBA TBA 36 MB TBA TBA TBA
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 6/12 TBA TBA 35 MB TBA TBA TBA

Here’s Everything We Know About The AMD’s Zen 3 Based Ryzen 5000 ‘Vermeer’ Desktop CPUs

The AMD Zen 3 architecture is said to be the greatest CPU design since the original Zen. It is a chip that has been completely revamped from the group up and focuses on three key features of which include significant IPC gains, faster clocks, and higher efficiency.

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AMD has so far confirmed themselves that Zen 3 brings a brand new CPU architecture, which helps deliver significant IPC gains, faster clocks, and even higher core counts than before. Some rumors have even pointed to a 17% increase in IPC and a 50% increase in Zen 3’s floating-point operations along with a major cache redesign.

We also got to see a major change to the cache design in an EPYC presentation, which showed that Zen 3 would be offering a unified cache design which should essentially double the cache that each Zen 3 core could have access compared to Zen 2.

The CPUs are also expected to get up to 200-300 MHz clock boost, which should bring Zen 3 based Ryzen processors close to the 10th Generation Intel Core offerings. That, along with the massive IPC increase and general changes to the architecture, would result in much faster performance than existing Ryzen 3000 processors, which already made a huge jump over Ryzen 2000 and Ryzen 1000 processors while being an evolutionary product rather than revolutionary, as AMD unveiled very recently.

The key thing to consider is that we will get to see the return of the chiplet architecture and AMD will retain support on the existing AM4 socket. The AM4 socket was to last until 2020 so it is likely that the Zen 3 based Ryzen 5000 CPUs would be the last family to utilize the socket before AMD goes to AM5 which would be designed around the future technologies such as DDR5 and USB 4.0. AMD’s X670 chipset was also hinted as to arrive by the end of this year and will feature enhanced PCIe Gen 4.0 support and increased I/O in the form of more M.2, SATA, and USB 3.2 ports.

It was recently confirmed by AMD that Ryzen 5000 Desktop CPUs will only be supported by 400 & 500-series chipsets while 300-series support would be left out.

AMD had also recently confirmed that Zen 3 based Ryzen 5000 desktop processors would mark the continuation of its high-performance journey. The Zen 3 architecture would be first available on the consumer desktop platform with the launch of the Vermeer family of CPUs that will replace the 3rd Gen Ryzen 3000 Matisse family of CPUs.

So, what’s next for AMD in the PC space? Well, I cannot share too much, but I can say our high-performance journey continues with our first “Zen 3” Client processor on-track to launch later this year. I will wrap by saying you haven’t seen the best of us yet.

AMD Executive Vice President of Computing & Graphics – Rick Bergman

As of now, the competitive advantage that AMD has with its Zen 2 based Ryzen 3000 is just way too big compared to whatever Intel has in their sleeves for this year, and Zen 3 based Ryzen 5000 CPUs are going to push that envelope even further. Expect AMD to unveil its next-generation Ryzen CPUs and the underlying Zen 3 core architecture on 8th October.

AMD CPU Roadmap (2018-2020)

Ryzen Family Ryzen 1000 Series Ryzen 2000 Series Ryzen 3000 Series Ryzen 4000 Series Ryzen 5000 Series Ryzen 6000 Series
Architecture Zen (1) Zen (1) / Zen+ Zen (2) / Zen+ Zen (3) / Zen 2 Zen (3)+ / Zen 3? Zen (4) / Zen 3?
Process Node 14nm 14nm / 12nm 7nm 7nm+ / 7nm 7nm+ / 7nm 5nm / 7nm+
Server EPYC ‘Naples’ EPYC ‘Naples’ EPYC ‘Rome’ EPYC ‘Milan’ EPYC ‘Milan’ EPYC ‘Genoa’
Max Server Cores / Threads 32/64 32/64 64/128 64/128 TBD TBD
High End Desktop Ryzen Threadripper 1000 Series (White Haven) Ryzen Threadripper 2000 Series (Coflax) Ryzen Threadripper 3000 Series (Castle Peak) Ryzen Threadripper 4000 Series (Genesis Peak) Ryzen Threadripper 5000 Series Ryzen Threadripper 6000 Series
Max HEDT Cores / Threads 16/32 32/64 64/128 64/128? TBD TBD
Mainstream Desktop Ryzen 1000 Series (Summit Ridge) Ryzen 2000 Series (Pinnacle Ridge) Ryzen 3000 Series (Matisse) Ryzen 4000 Series (Vermeer) Ryzen 5000 Series (Warhol) Ryzen 6000 Series (Raphael)
Max Mainstream Cores / Threads 8/16 8/16 16/32 16/32 TBD TBD
Budget APU N/A Ryzen 2000 Series (Raven Ridge) Ryzen 3000 Series (Picasso Zen+) Ryzen 4000 Series (Renoir Zen 2) Ryzen 5000 Series (Cezanne Zen 3) Ryzen 5000 Series (Rembrandt Zen 3)
Year 2017 2018 2019 2020/2021 2020/2021 2022
What do you want to see in AMD’s next-gen desktop CPUs?
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti 8 GB Custom Models Listed, Four Models Including Gigabyte’s AORUS Master, Gaming & Eagle Series_5f74b8dee9f7d.png

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti 8 GB Custom Models Listed, Four Models Including Gigabyte’s AORUS Master, Gaming & Eagle Series

NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 3060 Ti custom graphics cards from Gigabyte have been listed by EEC where they were submitted by the manufacturer for certification. This confirms that NVIDIA and its board partners are getting ready to unveil a fourth GeForce RTX  30 series graphics card next month that will target the mainstream segment.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti 8 GB Custom Graphics Cards Listed by EEC – Four Gigabyte Models Featuring AORUS Master, Gaming, & Eagle Series

The Gigabyte models that were listed at EEC were spotted by Komachi_Ensaka (via Videocardz). It looks like Gigabyte is working on at least four models which will be part of its GeForce RTX 3060 Ti series lineup. The custom models are listed below:

NVIDIA’s Official Response On GeForce RTX 30 Series Issues: SP-CAP vs MLCC Groupings Vary Depending on Design & Not Indicative of Quality

  • GIGABYTE RTX 3060 Ti 8GB AORUS Master (GV-N306TAORUS M-8GD)
  • GIGABYTE RTX 3060 Ti 8GB GAMING OC (GV-N306TGAMING OC-8GD)
  • GIGABYTE RTX 3060 Ti 8GB EAGLE OC (GV-N306TEAGLE OC-8GD)
  • GIGABYTE RTX 3060 Ti 8GB EAGLE (GV-N306TEAGLE-8GD)

As you can see, the GeForce RTX 3060 Ti is more or less confirmed now and the card will feature 8 GB of GDDR6 memory. Gigabyte will have the AORUS Master variant as its top model while the OC and standard variants of the Eagle and Gaming series will serve the gaming market at a lower price point.

As per previously leaked out specifications, the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti graphics card will use the GA104-200 GPU core and the latest PG190 SKU 10 PCB design (Reference & Founders Edition). The card will feature 4864 CUDA cores arranged in 38 SMs along with 8 GB of GDDR6 memory that will be operating at 14 Gbps across a 256-bit bus interface to deliver a total bandwidth of 448 GB/s. The graphics ard is rumored to feature a TDP of around 180W.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 Series ‘Ampere’ Graphics Card Specifications:

Graphics Card Name NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090
GPU Name Ampere GA104-200 Ampere GA104-300 Ampere GA102-200 Ampere GA102-300
Process Node Samsung 8nm Samsung 8nm Samsung 8nm Samsung 8nm
Die Size 395.2mm2 395.2mm2 628.4mm2 628.4mm2
Transistors 17.4 Billion 17.4 Billion 28 Billion 28 Billion
CUDA Cores 4864 5888 8704 10496
TMUs / ROPs TBA TBA 272 / 96 TBA
Tensor / RT Cores 152 / 38 184 / 46 272 / 68 328 / 82
Base Clock TBA 1500 MHz 1440 MHz 1400 MHz
Boost Clock TBA 1730 MHz 1710 MHz 1700 MHz
FP32 Compute TBA 20 TFLOPs 30 TFLOPs 36 TFLOPs
RT TFLOPs TBA 40 TFLOPs 58 TFLOPs 69 TFLOPs
Tensor-TOPs TBA 163 TOPs 238 TOPs 285 TOPs
Memory Capacity 8 GB GDDR6 8/16 GB GDDR6 10/20 GB GDDR6X 24 GB GDDR6X
Memory Bus 256-bit 256-bit 320-bit 384-bit
Memory Speed 14 Gbps 14 Gbps 19 Gbps 19.5 Gbps
Bandwidth 448 Gbps 448 Gbps 760 Gbps 936 Gbps
TDP 180W? 220W 320W 350W
Price (MSRP / FE) $399 US? $499 US $699 US $1499 US
Launch (Availability) October 2020 15th October 17th September 24th September

There’s no word on the availability of the graphics card yet but previous reports have highlighted at a late October launch for the graphics card so we might get to hear about the card around the time the GeForce RTX 3070 is launched. As for pricing, considering that the GeForce RTX 3070 costs $499 US, the GeForce RTX 3060 Ti could be priced around $349-$399 US while offering performance on par or faster than the GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER.

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X “Vermeer” 8 Core & 16 Thread Zen 3 CPU Benchmark Leaks Out – Faster Than Intel’s Fastest Core i9-10900K 10 Core Gaming Chip_5f72be9fa6428.jpeg

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X “Vermeer” 8 Core & 16 Thread Zen 3 CPU Benchmark Leaks Out – Faster Than Intel’s Fastest Core i9-10900K 10 Core Gaming Chip

The first performance benchmarks of AMD’s next-generation Ryzen 7 5800X “Vermeer” Zen 3 CPU have leaked out in the Ashes of The Singularity database. The benchmarks have been spotted by TUM APISAK and show that AMD’s upcoming 8 core will absolutely demolish Intel’s fastest 10 core chip when it comes to price/performance.

AMD’s Ryzen 7 5800X 8 Core & 16 Thread “Zen 3 Vermeer” CPU Benchmark Leak Out, Faster Than The Intel Core i9-10900K 10 Core CPU

The performance was measured in the Ashes of the Singularity benchmark at the 4K Crazy preset. While 4K tends to be more of a GPU-bound scenario, the AOTS benchmark does include indicators for CPU performance metrics.

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X “Vermeer” 12 Core & 24 Thread Zen 3 CPU Allegedly Up To 5 GHz With 150W TDP

The AMD Ryzen 7 5800X is one of the two Ryzen 5000 “Vermeer” series chips that are confirmed to be part of the launch lineup so far. We talked about the Ryzen 9 5900X yesterday which is a higher-end 12 core & 24 thread part while the Ryzen 7 5800X would replace the Ryzen 7 3800X at a similar price point. From the benchmark, the chip is listed as an 8 core part with 16 thread so the core config hasn’t been changed from its predecessor.

The first leaked benchmark of AMD’s next-generation Ryzen 7 5800X “Zen 3 Vermeer” CPU has been spotted by TUM_APISAK.

The fundamental changes to Zen 3 would come in the form of a new architecture for higher IPC gains, a redesigned CCD/cache structure, higher clocks, and improved efficiency. The clock speeds for the chip weren’t reported within the benchmark but the chip scored 5900 points which are on par with the Intel Core i9-10900K running at stock. Both setups were running a GeForce RTX 2080 graphics card.

What’s more important to look at are the CPU framerates and here you can see the Ryzen 7 5800X completely crushing the Intel Core i9-10900K in terms of max framerate. In the Normal Batch run, the AMD Ryzen 7 5800X delivers up to 22% higher framerate than the Intel Core i9-10900K. We do not know the final clocks for the Ryzen 7 5800X yet but the Intel Core i9-10900K does feature more cores and threads and even runs at clock speeds up to 5.3 GHz. Previously leaked OPN codes did point out up to 4.6 GHz clock speeds for engineering samples which is the same boost clock as the Ryzen 7 3800X. Since the Ryzen 7 3800X operates at up to 4.7 GHz boost clocks, we might get some thing close to 4.7-4.8 GHz with the Zen 3 based parts. Following are the leaked OPN codes of Zen 3 engineering samples from Igor’s Lab:

  • OPN 1: 100-000000059-14_46 / 37_Y (12 Cores)
  • OPN 2: 100-000000059-15_46 / 37_N (12 Cores)
  • OPN 1: 100-000000063-07_46 / 40_N (8 Cores)
  • OPN 2: 100-000000063-08_46 / 40_Y (8 Cores)
  • OPN 3: 100-000000063-23_44 / 38_N (8 Cores)

Considering if AMD prices its Ryzen 7 5800X in the same ballpark as the Ryzen 7 3800X, around $350-$400 US, that would mean a big win for consumers as they’ll get performance equivalent to a $500 US+ chip at a much lower price. Additionally, the AMD Ryzen 5000 CPUs will be using an enhanced 7nm+ process node and we can expect higher efficiency resulting in much lower power draw than the competing Intel chips.

AMD Navi 21, 22 and 23 Massive Technical Specifications Leak – Flagship Navi 21 GPU To Have 80 CUs

Here’s Everything We Know About The AMD’s Zen 3 Based Ryzen 5000 ‘Vermeer’ Desktop CPUs

The AMD Zen 3 architecture is said to be the greatest CPU design since the original Zen. It is a chip that has been completely revamped from the group up and focuses on three key features of which include significant IPC gains, faster clocks, and higher efficiency.

AMD has so far confirmed themselves that Zen 3 brings a brand new CPU architecture, which helps deliver significant IPC gains, faster clocks, and even higher core counts than before. Some rumors have even pointed to a 17% increase in IPC and a 50% increase in Zen 3’s floating-point operations along with a major cache redesign.

We also got to see a major change to the cache design in an EPYC presentation, which showed that Zen 3 would be offering a unified cache design which should essentially double the cache that each Zen 3 core could have access compared to Zen 2.

The CPUs are also expected to get up to 200-300 MHz clock boost, which should bring Zen 3 based Ryzen processors close to the 10th Generation Intel Core offerings. That, along with the massive IPC increase and general changes to the architecture, would result in much faster performance than existing Ryzen 3000 processors, which already made a huge jump over Ryzen 2000 and Ryzen 1000 processors while being an evolutionary product rather than revolutionary, as AMD unveiled very recently.

The key thing to consider is that we will get to see the return of the chiplet architecture and AMD will retain support on the existing AM4 socket. The AM4 socket was to last until 2020 so it is likely that the Zen 3 based Ryzen 5000 CPUs would be the last family to utilize the socket before AMD goes to AM5 which would be designed around the future technologies such as DDR5 and USB 4.0. AMD’s X670 chipset was also hinted as to arrive by the end of this year and will feature enhanced PCIe Gen 4.0 support and increased I/O in the form of more M.2, SATA, and USB 3.2 ports.

It was recently confirmed by AMD that Ryzen 5000 Desktop CPUs will only be supported by 400 & 500-series chipsets while 300-series support would be left out.

AMD had also recently confirmed that Zen 3 based Ryzen 5000 desktop processors would mark the continuation of its high-performance journey. The Zen 3 architecture would be first available on the consumer desktop platform with the launch of the Vermeer family of CPUs that will replace the 3rd Gen Ryzen 3000 Matisse family of CPUs.

So, what’s next for AMD in the PC space? Well, I cannot share too much, but I can say our high-performance journey continues with our first “Zen 3” Client processor on-track to launch later this year. I will wrap by saying you haven’t seen the best of us yet.

AMD Executive Vice President of Computing & Graphics – Rick Bergman

As of now, the competitive advantage that AMD has with its Zen 2 based Ryzen 3000 is just way too big compared to whatever Intel has in their sleeves for this year, and Zen 3 based Ryzen 5000 CPUs are going to push that envelope even further. Expect AMD to unveil its next-generation Ryzen CPUs and the underlying Zen 3 core architecture on 8th October.

AMD CPU Roadmap (2018-2020)

Ryzen Family Ryzen 1000 Series Ryzen 2000 Series Ryzen 3000 Series Ryzen 4000 Series Ryzen 5000 Series Ryzen 6000 Series
Architecture Zen (1) Zen (1) / Zen+ Zen (2) / Zen+ Zen (3) / Zen 2 Zen (3)+ / Zen 3? Zen (4) / Zen 3?
Process Node 14nm 14nm / 12nm 7nm 7nm+ / 7nm 7nm+ / 7nm 5nm / 7nm+
Server EPYC ‘Naples’ EPYC ‘Naples’ EPYC ‘Rome’ EPYC ‘Milan’ EPYC ‘Milan’ EPYC ‘Genoa’
Max Server Cores / Threads 32/64 32/64 64/128 64/128 TBD TBD
High End Desktop Ryzen Threadripper 1000 Series (White Haven) Ryzen Threadripper 2000 Series (Coflax) Ryzen Threadripper 3000 Series (Castle Peak) Ryzen Threadripper 4000 Series (Genesis Peak) Ryzen Threadripper 5000 Series Ryzen Threadripper 6000 Series
Max HEDT Cores / Threads 16/32 32/64 64/128 64/128? TBD TBD
Mainstream Desktop Ryzen 1000 Series (Summit Ridge) Ryzen 2000 Series (Pinnacle Ridge) Ryzen 3000 Series (Matisse) Ryzen 4000 Series (Vermeer) Ryzen 5000 Series (Warhol) Ryzen 6000 Series (Raphael)
Max Mainstream Cores / Threads 8/16 8/16 16/32 16/32 TBD TBD
Budget APU N/A Ryzen 2000 Series (Raven Ridge) Ryzen 3000 Series (Picasso Zen+) Ryzen 4000 Series (Renoir Zen 2) Ryzen 5000 Series (Cezanne Zen 3) Ryzen 5000 Series (Rembrandt Zen 3)
Year 2017 2018 2019 2020/2021 2020/2021 2022
What do you want to see in AMD’s next-gen desktop CPUs?