How do you again up your Steam library?

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Portal 2 robots hugging with an ASK PC GAMER badge on top right.

(Picture credit score: valve)

Certainly one of Steam’s most dear time-saving options is the flexibility to again up restore your sport library with out inflicting an excessive amount of of a headache. Backing up your steam library is definitely so much simpler to do than it appears and it ensures you some peace of thoughts. 

So why is having the ability to again your Steam library necessary? Preserving an archive of your favourite Steam video games is a brilliant concept, particularly in case you undergo a catastrophic onerous drive failure or buy a model new gaming PC. Restoring a backup takes much less time than redownloading all of your video games particularly when you’ve got a lot of video games put in. 

There are two methods you’ll be able to go about backing up and restoring your Steam library, and I am going to go over each of them. 

How do I backup my Steam Library?

To backup, go to your Steam library. Merely click on on the Steam menu and click on “Backup and Restore Video games.” The next menu possibility will ask if you wish to again up a presently put in sport or restore a backup. Click on the primary possibility, and you will be introduced with the record of Steam video games you presently have put in in your pc. Select the sport or video games on the record you wish to again up. 

Subsequent, you may choose the vacation spot. You’ll be able to select one other onerous drive and even an exterior machine as long as you have got sufficient disk area. It is clever to transform these gadgets like thumb drives or exterior onerous drives to NTFS as an alternative of older file methods with measurement limits like FAT32’s 4GB cap.

The method should not take perpetually; simply word that the bigger the sport file measurement, the longer it is going to take—although this might be a very good time to put money into a pleasant speedy exterior SSD

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Steam Library Backup Process

(Picture credit score: Future)

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Steam Library Backup Process

(Picture credit score: Future)

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Steam Library Backup Process

(Picture credit score: Future)

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Steam Library Backup Process

(Picture credit score: Future)

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Steam Library Backup Process

(Picture credit score: Future)

How do I restore my Steam Library from a backup?

To revive a Steam sport from a backup, go to the Steam menu and click on on “Restore a earlier backup” from the Again and Restore Video games. You may be prompted to seek out the file location of the sport you wish to restore; Steam will then validate the recordsdata, which can take some time relying on the dimensions of the file, however you need to be capable of hit play on the sport as soon as it is performed. 

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Restore Backup library process.

(Picture credit score: Future)

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Restore Backup library process.

(Picture credit score: Future)

Is there an excellent simpler solution to backup and restore my Steam Library?

The opposite technique for backing up and restoring is fast and soiled. Discover the subfolder the place your Steam shops sport recordsdata. By default, it ought to be “C:Program Recordsdata (x86)SteamSteamAppscommon.” It is best to see a listing of sport recordsdata right here, copy your entire folder and paste it onto your storage machine. 

To revive, delete any preexisting installs and duplicate the folder again to its authentic location. Choose “Set up” from the sport’s library entry, and Steam will uncover all native recordsdata, obtain updates, and restore them. This takes much less time than the primary technique—you simply have to make certain you have got sufficient area to maneuver recordsdata round.  

Jorge Jimenez

Jorge is a {hardware} author from the enchanted lands of New Jersey. When he isn’t filling the workplace with the scent of Pop-Tarts, he is reviewing all types of gaming {hardware} from headsets to sport pads. He is been protecting video games and tech for almost ten years and has written for Dualshockers, WCCFtech, and Tom’s Information.