Samsung’s massive Odyssey G9 gaming monitor is getting a Mini LED overhaul, and we can’t wait

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Samsung Odyssey G9 gaming monitor from the back with blue lighting ring switched on

(Image credit: Samsung)

Samsung’s 49-inch Odyssey G9 gaming monitor is both ludicrous and an absolute joy at the same time. So, with Samsung announcing it is upgrading its popular ultrawide monster to a new Quantum Mini LED panel, we’re positively drooling. 

While we’re still a way off MicroLED and OLED panels in PC monitors, the 2021 model of the 49-inch behemoth should deliver something of a quarter-step in the right direction: enhanced black levels and greater backlight zoning control we expect will make for a prettier picture.

Here’s what Samsung has to say about the Quantum Mini LED tech itself:

“At just 1/40th the size of conventional LEDs, Quantum Mini LEDs allow for ultra-fine light control. With deep blacks, bright lights, and upscaling technology smarter than any Samsung TV has ever offered, Samsung Neo QLED delivers an ultra-realistic picture—whether you are watching a football game, or playing one on your gaming console.”

Samsung Neo QLED is the Quantum Mini LED tech plus a Neo Quantum Processor, and that seems to be limited to the TVs at this time. The G9 will incorporate both Quantum Matrix Technology and Quantum Mini LED, though, but we can’t wait to see what that does in a high-res gaming panel.

There’s no date to Samsung’s Mini LED upgrade just yet, but it’s planned for sometime in 2021. It probably won’t come cheap, though, as the existing G9 model will set you back $1,479 (£1,289). 

At least for the price of two PC monitors you end up with something close to the same overall real estate: The Odyssey G9 features a 5,120 x 1,440 resolution.

Beyond this chunky lad, Samsung has announced a partnership with AMD to develop the first TV with support for AMD’s FreeSync Premium Pro standard (that’s the HDR one). The first to arrive with that feature will be Samsung’s Q70A 4K (and the bigger, high-end models) as well as its The Frame TV.

You guessed it, The Frame looks like a picture frame. And yes, I do think it’s quite cool, if only a little pretentious (a little? – Ed.).

FreeSync Premium Pro nets you:

  • Colour and luminance certification
  • HDR capabilities
  • At least 120Hz at minimum FHD resolution
  • Low framerate compensation
  • Low latency with SDR or HDR

So that’s something to look out for if you’re resoundingly team red and a living room gamer. Nvidia cards will also support some FreeSync monitors and TVs, too, so you’re not totally left in the lurch if you’re powered by GeForce. Support isn’t guaranteed, however.

There’s no ‘Silicon Valley’ where Jacob grew up, but part of his home country is known as ‘The Valleys’ and can therefore be easily confused for a happening place in the tech world. From there he graduated to professionally break things and then write about it for cash in the city of Bath, UK.